Celebrating the Wondrous Work of God

“Bless the Lord God, the God of Israel — the only One who does wondrous things! Bless God’s glorious name forever; let His glory fill all the earth!” — Psalm 72:18-19, CEB

When was the last time you noticed the “wondrous things” God has done in your life?

A question my Sunday school teacher, Fran, at Mechanicsburg (PA) Church of the Brethren would ask is, “What were your God moments this week?” Sometimes she would begin with this question, but on other occasions, it would naturally seep into our conversation or even close our time together as people reflected on how they had seen “wondrous things.”

I travel often in my role as director of Mission Advancement, and during a recent trip, I noticed a “God moment.” I like to travel by train when I work at the General Offices in Elgin, IL—taking the Pennsylvanian from Harrisburg to Pittsburgh and then Capital Limited into Chicago’s Union Station. The autumn season sets a beautiful stage to travel the rails. Getting into the mountainous areas of central Pennsylvania, the end of the harvest season can be observed as you pass by fields. Orange, brown, green, yellow, and red are the colors that splash this canvas. Traveling by train slows things down and offers the opportunity to reflect on what I’ve seen and experienced. Most trips include having conversations with fellow travelers — hearing their stories, sharing my own, and providing words of encouragement, grace, and peace, if it’s needed.

A few weeks ago, at the conclusion of the October meeting for Mission and Ministry Board, I boarded the train at Union Station to begin the trip back to Pennsylvania. After beginning to talk with my seatmate, we noticed peculiar behavior from the passenger in front of us. This person had been flailing about in their seat, speaking loudly with colorful language, and causing a bit of a ruckus. There was a feeling of concern for those of us who were directly around this person, a sense of uncertainty as to whether their actions should be confronted, and concern about the outcome of a confrontation. As time went on, several people in the railcar shared concerns with Amtrak personnel, who eventually confronted the passenger. The final outcome was the removal of the passenger from the train by local law enforcement.

So, where did I see the wondrous things of God in this situation?

God was present through each of my railcar mates. Two people were able to remove and dispose of alcohol the passenger had brought onto the train by approaching them and asking for a drink. Another man engaged the person in conversation to distract them from causing further alarm. In general, we all looked out for each other as the situation unfolded and worked together to make sure everyone, including the unruly passenger, was safe until the authorities arrived to intervene.

In this present age, though our culture makes it seem much easier to throw a fist than pass the peace, I watched a group of strangers come together and work to care for one another. We were “strangers no more, but part of one humanity.” This situation gave me a renewed hope for humanity and reminded me God is always present with us.

Where do you see the wondrous things of God in your life, in your community, or in your place of worship?

The Church of the Brethren reveals “another way of living” to those we serve, one in which God’s “glory fills all the earth!” We do this through our Global Mission and Service partnerships in Venezuela, Rwanda, Democratic Republic of Congo, Burundi, and other countries. Another way of living is revealed through the work of our Office of Peacebuilding and Policy as staff meet in Iraqi Kurdistan with ecumenical partners and government officials to talk about active USAID projects to respond to the genocide of Yazidis, the persecution of Christians, and other vulnerable groups. Through the programs of Discipleship Ministries and the Office of Ministry, congregations and pastors are cared for and encouraged. In these ministries and more, God is doing wondrous things around us.

As we enter this season of thankfulness, joy, and giving, we invite you to consider how you will partner with us. May we celebrate the wondrous work of God among us!

This reflection was written by Traci Rabenstein, director of Mission Advancement of the Church of the Brethren for Giving Tuesday Dec. 3. Join them in celebrating — now or then — by making a gift to the Church of the Brethren at brethren.org/givingtuesday.

THOUGHT TO REMEMBER: A warm smile is the universal language of kindness. — William Arthur Ward

About wisdomfromafather

I'm just an ordinary guy walking along the journey of life.
This entry was posted in Sunday sermonette and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Celebrating the Wondrous Work of God

  1. Today does not seem filled with wonder;
    life’s not giving, it is taking.
    Perhaps there’s glory in the thunder,
    but in the storm, my heart is breaking.
    Late last night I lost a friend,
    a dog who made my days so bright,
    and I now attend another’s end,
    and somehow, dammit, this ain’t right.
    My life was built on competence,
    and I could right most any wrong,
    with actions and with eloquence,
    but I cannot abide this darkling song
    Lord, give me strength to move ahead,
    and thus to honor the well-loved dead.

  2. Bruce says:

    Andrew….sorry to hear about the passing of your dog. Being an animal lover myself, I understand the pain and heartbreak of losing a beloved pet. It’s like losing your best friend. I can’t take your emotional pain away, but I hope you will find peace eventually.

I'd love to hear your thoughts on this subject!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s